Final (Research Question) Countdown

The Final Blog Post. Boy oh boy, though it will go out with a bang that’s for sure. Why is that? Because of my indecisiveness, I have gone through several research questions and now found one where I can find research in references to writing, rhetoric, purpose, and much much more. For those who keep losing track of what my research question here it is: How has the language of sportswriting changed because of Twitter?

I first went through my old blog posts about my question of social media and it’s impact on sports and went through each source to see if I could deem any of them appropriate and specific enough to my current research question…luckily I found four of my sources that focused on Twitter that I reviewed thoroughly and can still use them in my research. The first source is “How do sports reporters adapt to the internet?” using the search terms “Social media and it’s impact on sports.” My second source I used the same search terms and the source is “Twitter’s impact on Sports Journalism.” My third source came from the same search terms and the source is “How is the rise of Twitter affecting football journalism?” My fourth source came proquest after using the search terms “sports writing” “Social Media” and found a dissertation written by a former SU student Brian Moritz on “Rooting For The Story: Institutional Sports Journalism in the Digital Age.” I would link the URL, but proquest is very picky and selective about that. I will go into further details of these sources on my annotated bibliography.

Four down, many more to go. I went to Google after scrounging through my old sources and googled Twitter’s impact on sports writing and found a wordpress account actually related to my research question by Laurie Bell who has posted links to sources that she found useful and some of them were ones that I used as well, so I deemed that useful enough to pluck a source from that page. There was a research journal article by two authors, Mary Sheffer and Brad Schultz titled “Paradigm shift or passing fad? Twitter and Sports Journalism” that I thought was an interesting read. I also searched “How has Twitter changed sports writing?” and found a great source on Google, a dissertation even (WHO KNEW THOSE WERE ON GOOGLE!) titled “Twitter and Sports Journalism: a study of how Twitter has changed sports journalism” My last source from Google is a piece on sports writing and Twitter in the use of baseball. It is a specific genre, but gives me evidence to back up how it is indeed affecting sports writing all over the variety of sports being played. “How Twitter Has Changed Baseball Coverage, for Better or Worse, 140 Characters at a Time”

This is all interesting because my research question has become more specific and more importantly, I have evidence in the form of sources to support my claims that the language of sportswriting has changed because of Twitter. I used the search term “Twitter” “sportswriting” and “change” on proquest to see if there is any relationship between these three words and I found an interesting source titled “Twitter: good or bad for sports?” It even had a quote that helped me out a lot in what I was looking for. “Twitter has undeniably changed the nature of sports writing because results and criticism are instantly available.” A source that I found, for my lucky number and final source 10 is the one I find very relatable to me. I used to write for a local high school and would use Twitter a lot. Hence, why I’m asking the question of how Twitter has changed the language of sports writing and I finally found a source that has helped back me up on it. Of course, it’ll be more present in my annotated bibliography, but the source is titled “Twitter adds another element to High School Football coverage” and talks about how sports writing has been changed because of Twitter. A FANTASTIC FIND.

This is a pretty long blog post, but I summed up almost everything after two weeks of not finding anything I deemed of value, minus the four sources I kept, but found six new sources that have strengthened the evidence for my claims that Twitter is changing the language of sports writing.

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